express1

express

Publication Dates: 18 February 1956 – 1960
Number of Issues Published: 212 (#74 – #285)
Color: Colour cover
Dimensions: Tabloid (early issues)
Publishing Format: Was Ongoing Series

Numbering continues from Junior Express Weekly (Beaverbrook, 1955 series) #73.

Express Weekly was a children’s comic of the late 1950s, and featured, among others:

Wulf the Briton, originally Freedom Is The Prize drawn by Ron Embleton
Journey Into Space, from 1956, drawn first by Tacconi, and then Bruce Cornwall and Terence Patrick

Express Weekly (later TV Express Weekly) was a rival to Eagle of Dan Dare fame.

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UPDATE 11-09-2018

Junior Express Weekly 39

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369

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366,368-370




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UPDATE 05-04-2018

76,213


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TV Express 366,368,370



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TV Express Annual 1961

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TV Express Annual 1962

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TV Express Weekly 320,348


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UPDATE 26-01-2018

179, Junior 39


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TV Express Weekly

301

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75,80-84,156







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174,176-178,256,257,265







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TV Express Weekly 338,347,349,351




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13 responses »

  1. Mr Tweedy says:

    Just noticed you have another section on TV Express – which is the same comic as this one – so a couple you already have – suggest merging the two sections together.

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  2. FrankMc Diarmid says:

    Express Weekly was a British children’s comic magazine, published between February 18, 1956 and 20 April 1960. It was a rival to Eagle of Dan Dare fame. “Express Weekly” was on 20 April 1960 renamed TV Express Weekly

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  3. arthur magida says:

    any idea where I can locate a copy of the Junior Express Weekly from July 12, 1956? I’m seeking an article titled “The Gestapo Pounce,” about Noor Inayat Khan. Thanks

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    • boutje777 says:

      I am afraid i don’t know where to find it, i will keep my eyes open for it.

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      • arthur magida says:

        that would be great. thanks. for the American publisher, W.W. Norton, I’m writing a biography of Noor Inayat Khan. She was in the SOE in France in 1943. Killed at Dachau in September 1944. that Junior Express Weekly story about her in 1956 would be, as far as I can determine, the 1st effort to tell her story to children. Maybe you know of any archives in England that have 1956 issues of the Junior Express?

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        • boutje777 says:

          I wish i knew, i will love to read that story.

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          • arthur magida says:

            I’d love to read it, too. Was the Junior Express Weekly published by a newspaper? Which one? They may have back issues in their archives or on microfilm. Also, since I’m writing from the U.S., I’m not familiar with how England treats its past. In this country, the Library of Congress in Washington has back issues of virtually every publication ever printed in the US. Is there a comparable institution in the UK? Maybe it has Junior Express Weekly’s from 1956? Thanks again for your help

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            • boutje777 says:

              You better ask this question on the frontpage of the blog because that is where most visitors read comments, i am not British myself, i just love the comics.

              This is what i found out.
              Junior Express was first published by Beaverbrook Newspapers on 4 September 1954, later by City Magazines. It was renamed Junior Express Weekly with issue 39, then Express Weekly with issue 74.

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  4. arthur magida says:

    Your idea about posting my quandary on the front page of the blog is a good one. I just asked a fella in England who’s helping with research if he’ll track down the issue of the Junior Express I’m seeking. If he can’t, I’ll do as you suggest

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