Uncanny Tales

Publisher: Alan Class
Publication Dates: 1963 – [circa 1988 – 1989]
Number of Issues Published: 188 (#[nn] – #187)
Color: Full Color Cover; Black & White Interior
Dimensions: 7.25″ x 9.25″
Paper Stock: Glossy cover newsprint interior
Binding: Squarebound
Publishing Format: Was Ongoing
Publication Type: magazine

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Alan Class title that began publication in May 1963, reprinting stories from several U.S. companies including Marvel, Charlton and Tower. There was no particular order to the reprints, which skipped from company to company and title to title, and, since Alan Class assumed a turnover of readers as the grew up, he would recycle some covers and stories every few years, resulting in identical covers on different issues interspersed throughout the run of the title

135,137,141,146,169





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Sinister Tales

Publisher: Alan Class
Publication Dates: 1964 – [circa 1988 – 1989]
Number of Issues Published: 228 (#1 – #227)
Color: Colour Cover; Black & White Interior
Dimensions: 7.25″ x 9.25″
Paper Stock: Glossy cover newsprint interior
Binding: Perfect Bound
Publishing Format: Was Ongoing Series
Publication Type: magazine

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

One of Alan Class’ many titles reprinting American comics for the British market, and one of their most enduring, published between January 1964 and January 1989, for a total of 227 issues. As with most Alan Class titles, there was little pattern to what stories were reprinted, and it was common for characters from one company to appear one issue, and characters from an entirely different company to appear the next.

84,139,148,166,188





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Garfield

Publisher: Ravette Books
Publication Dates: 1989 – ?
Number of Issues Published: 70 (#1 – #12/1994)
Color: Color

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Garfield is a comic created by Jim Davis. Published since 1978, it chronicles the life of the title character, the cat Garfield, the human Jon Arbuckle, and the dog Odie. As of 2013, it was syndicated in roughly 2,580 newspapers and journals, and held the Guinness World Record for being the world’s most widely syndicated comic strip.

Though this is rarely mentioned in print, Garfield is set in Muncie, Indiana, the home of Jim Davis, according to the television special Happy Birthday, Garfield. Common themes in the strip include Garfield’s laziness, obsessive eating, coffee, and disdain of Mondays and diets. The strip’s focus is mostly on the interactions among Garfield, Jon, and Odie, but other recurring minor characters appear as well. Originally created with the intentions to “come up with a good, marketable character”,[2] Garfield has spawned merchandise earning $750 million to $1 billion annually. In addition to the various merchandise and commercial tie-ins, the strip has spawned several animated television specials, two animated television series, two theatrical feature-length live-action/CGI animated films, and three fully CGI animated direct-to-video movies.

1989 1-3

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1989 4-6

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1989 7-9

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1989 10,11

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1990 1-3

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1990 4,5, 1994 8

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Summer Special 1990,1991

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Comic Cuts

Publisher: Amalgamated Press
Publication Dates: 17 May 1890 – 1953
Number of Issues Published: 3006 (#v1#1 – #3006)
Color: Black and white and duotone cover; Black and white interiors
Paper Stock: Newsprint
Binding: Saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Was ongoing
Publication Type: magazine

Merged into Knockout (Amalgamated Press, 1939 series)

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Comic Cuts was a British comic book magazine. It was created by the reporter Alfred Harmsworth through his company Amalgamated Press (AP). It was published from 1890 to 1953, lasting 3006 issues, and in its early days inspired other publishers to produce rival comics. Its first issue was an assortment of reprints from American publications. During its lifetime, the comic merged with many others including Golden Penny (1928), Jolly Comic (1939) and Larks (1940). Comic Cuts finally disappeared in September 1953 when it was merged with Knockout. Comic Cuts held the record for the most issues of a British weekly comic for 46 years, until The Dandy overtook it in 1999.

The comic is mentioned in G. K. Chesterton’s 1905 book Heretics and 1910 book Alarms and Discursions, and in a line of Cyril Tawney’s song Chicken on a Raft – “He’s looking at me Comic Cuts again”. It was also mentioned in Clive Dunn’s 1971 hit record “Grandad” – “Comic Cuts, all different things.” The character Annie Twohig refers to it in Lennox Robinson’s play “Drama at Inish” (“Annie: I’ll stay at home and read a magazine.” “Constance: Which magazine?” “Annie: Comic Cuts.”).

0001 1890-05-17
2164 1931-11-07
2224 1932-12-31
2685 1942-03-28
2686 1942-04-11

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2687 1942-04-25
2688 1942-05-09
2721 1943-08-14
2722 1943-08-28

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2799 1946-08-10
2931 1951-08-25
2983 1953-04-04
3003 1953-08-22

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Bananaman

Bananaman is a fictional character appearing in British comic books. Bananaman is a parody of traditional superheroes, being portrayed as a schoolboy who is transformed into a muscled, caped figure when he eats a banana. The character originally appeared in Nutty as the backpage strip in Issue 1, dated 16 February 1980 drawn by John Geering. He has since appeared in The Dandy and The Beano.
The original strip, by Dave Donaldson and Steve Bright, written and developed by the latter, and mostly drawn by John Geering until his death in 1999, is essentially a parody of Superman and Batman with shades of Captain Marvel and his British twin, Marvelman and occasionally other Silver Age characters, while also combining comic slapstick with a heavy dose of eccentric British humour similar to Alan Moore’s contemporary work on Captain Britain.

After John Geering died in 1999, Barrie Appleby took over and later Tom Paterson. In 2003, the original scriptwriter, Steve Bright drew it, until 2007. Sporadically from 2007 to 2010 the character appeared in reprinted strips from the John Geering era. For a short time, in late 2008, artist Chris McGhie reinvented Bananaman in a series of new strips. Chris’ other work included The Three Bears for The Beano (in 2002) and the characters on Yoplait’s ‘Wildlife’ product range. Two new strips appeared that year drawn by Barrie Appleby as well.

Since the Dandy revamp occurring in October 2010, Wayne Thompson took over drawing Bananaman in a style reminiscent of French cartoonist Lisa Mandel, a popular artist in The Dandy who has previously drawn Jak, Agent Dog 2-Zero and, occasionally, Bully Beef and Chips. In Issue 3515, Wayne’s style notably changes and looks more cartoony and detailed. As of spring 2011, Thompson’s version of Bananaman appears in full colour over two pages.

From 1983–1986, Bananaman also had his own annual. This was unusual because, unlike many other comics at the time, Nutty never had an annual. Unlike Dennis the Menace and Bash Street Kids, which mostly consisted of reprints these annuals were entirely new material.

In issue 3618, dated 14 January 2012, Bananaman made his debut appearance, as John Geering reprints, in The Beano, however he continued to appear in The Dandy. Another Beano character, Bananagirl of Super School, was revealed to be his cousin.

The Dandy print comic ended in December 2012, but Bananaman was still seen in the digital version drawn by Andy Janes. New Bananaman strips drawn by Wayne Thompson and written by Nigel Auchterlounie, Kev F Sutherland and lately Cavan Scott continue to run in The Beano through 2014. In 2016, writing duties for the strip were taken over by Tommy Donbavand.

In the strip, Eric Wimp, an ordinary schoolboy living at 29 Acacia Road, Nuttytown (later changed to Dandytown and then Beanotown when the strip moved to other comics), eats a banana to transform into Bananaman, an adult superhero, sporting a distinctive cowled blue and yellow outfit complete with a yellow two-tailed cape resembling a banana skin. His superpowers include the ability to fly, superhuman strength (often quoted as “twenty men… twenty big men” but sometimes limitless, with “nerks”, “women” and “snowmen” all being used in place of “men”), and seeming invulnerability. This is offset by the fact that he is just as naive and foolish (if not more so) as his alter ego; as mentioned in the comic once or twice, he has the “muscles of twenty men and the brains of twenty mussels”.

If Bananaman needs extra power, bananas can be eaten for strength boosts, provided by his faithful pet crow; if he does not have enough strength to shatter an ice block, for example, after eating another banana, he will have enough. If he eats lots of bananas in one sitting, he quickly becomes obese in his transformation; if he eats bananas that are not full, he transforms with extra weight in the lower part of his body. There have also been comics where he has eaten a variant on normal bananas, and transforms differently, reflecting the difference in that banana. The effects of eating the bananas are not consistent from story to story.

Annual 1985, Summer Special 1984

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Summer Special 1985-1987

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Summer Special 1989,1992,1993

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Battle Picture Weekly

battlepw1

battlepw

Battle Picture Weekly

Publisher: IPC
Publication Dates: 8 March, 1975 – 16 October, 1976
Number of Issues Published: 85 (#1-#85)
Publication Dates: 8 October 1977 – 12 November 1977
Number of Issues Published: 6 (#136-#141)
Color: Color cover;
Black and White interior
Dimensions: Standard Modern British size
Paper Stock: Newsprint

Battle Picture Weekly and Valiant

Publication Dates: 23 October 1976 – 1 October 1977
Number of Issues Published: 50 (#86-#135)
Color: Colour cover; Black and White interior
Dimensions: Standard Modern British size
Paper Stock: Newsprint

Battle Action

Publisher: IPC
Publication Dates: 19 November 1977 – 25 July 1981
Number of Issues Published: 184 (#142-#325)
Color: Colour cover; Black and White interior
Dimensions: Standard Modern British size
Paper Stock: Newsprint
Publishing Format: Was ongoing series
Publication Type: magazine

Battle

Publisher: IPC
Publication Dates: 1 August 1981 – 1 October 1983
Number of Issues Published: 114 (#326-439)
Publication Dates: 6 December 1986 – 17 January 1987
Number of Issues Published: 7 (#605-611)
Color: Colour cover; Black and White interior
Dimensions: Magazine-size
Paper Stock: Newsprint
Binding: saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Was ongoing
Publication Type: magazine

Battle Action Force

Publisher: IPC
Publication Dates: 8 October 1983 – 29 November 1986
Number of Issues Published: 165 (#440-#604)
Color: full colour cover; mostly black and white interior
Dimensions: standard British weekly size
Paper Stock: newsprint cover and interior
Binding: saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: was ongoing series

Battle Stormforce

Publication Dates: 24 January 1987 – 23 January 1988
Number of Issues Published: 53 (#612-#664)
Color: Colour cover; Black and White interior
Dimensions: Standard Modern British size
Paper Stock: Newsprint

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Battle Picture Weekly, at various time also known as Battle Action Force, Battle and Battle with Storm Force, was a British war comic published by IPC Magazines from (issues dates) 8 March 1975 to 23 January 1988, when it merged with Eagle. Most stories were set in World War II, with some based on other conflicts.

A notable feature of the comic, suited to its era of circulation, was its letters page with readers sending in stories of their fathers’ and grandfathers’ exploits during the First World War and the Second World War, often in an effort to win a nominal star letter prize. The comic at various times printed colour pinups of tanks, planes, ships, etc. in the centrefold or the back page (inner or outer).

Publication history

In 1974, in response to the success of the D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd war comic Warlord, IPC hired freelance writers Pat Mills and John Wagner to develop a rival title. Mills and Wagner brought in fellow freelancer Gerry Finley-Day to help develop stories. Dave Hunt was made editor. Doug Church also was very involved as a ‘Creative Editor’ on covers, layouts, features. When the title proved a success, Mills went on to create Action and 2000 AD, while Wagner was asked to revive Valiant. The attempts to breathe new life into Valiant were unsuccessful, and it was merged with Battle in October 1976.[2] For some time afterwards the merged comic was entitled Battle Picture Weekly and Valiant. Action also merged with Battle on 19 November 1977, the resulting comic being named Battle Action. In 1979, Terry Magee was appointed editor while Dave Hunt became editor of the new “Eagle”. Barrie Tomlinson was the Group Editor and Gil Page was the Managing Editor. The Director of the Youth Group was John Sanders. In 1982 the
comic was retitled again, to Battle. Assistant Editor(for most of Battle comic’s life): Jim Storrie Art Editors included Roy Stedall-Humphrys and Peter Downer Editorial assistants included Barrie Clements, Roy Preston, Richard Burton Art assistants: Tim Skomski, Martin Goldring The details are:

Tie-in with Action Force

From 1983 through to 1986, the comic ran a series of stories relating to the Palitoy range of action figures, Action Force. The Action Force characters initially guest-featured in a comic strip serial in Battle for four weeks in July 1983. The strip proved to be so popular that a further five promotional mini-comics were included free with every IPC publication in the weeks to follow. On 8 October 1983, Action Force joined the pages of Battle full-time and the comic was retitled Battle Action Force.

Eventually, in line with the increasing popularity of the toys, the focus of the comic moved towards Action Force (at the expense of some of the longer-running and more traditional wartime stories) and providing the back-stories to the action figures in circulation at the time.

During 1984 to 1985, Palitoy increasingly used the comic as a promotional publication, running competitions, mail-in offers and fan-club elements of the Action Force toy range through its pages. As Action Force itself transmuted to its G.I. Joe equivalent (see Action Force – Third generation), the comic took on the role of providing continuity with regard to the diverging storylines and characters. By the end of 1986, Palitoy had lost the Action Force licence to Marvel UK and the comic was again re-titled first as Battle (1986) and then Battle with Storm Force (1987) prior to its eventual merger with Eagle (1988).

The details of title changes are:

Battle Picture Weekly (8 March 1975 [issue #1] – 16 October 1976 [issue #85])
Battle Picture Weekly and Valiant (23 October 1976 [issue #86] – 1 October 1977 [issue #135])
Battle Picture Weekly (8 October 1977 [issue #136] – 12 November 1977 [issue #141])
Battle Action (19 November 1977 [issue #142] – 25 July 1981 [issue #325])
Battle (1 August 1981 [issue #326] – 1 October 1983 [issue #439])
Battle Action Force (8 October 1983 [issue #440] – 29 November 1986 [issue #604])
Battle (6 December 1986 [issue #605] – 17 January 1987 [issue #611])
Battle Storm Force (24 January 1987 [issue #612] – 23 January 1988 [issue #664])

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UPDATE 19-02-2018

Battle Action Force

501-506

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507-512

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513-518

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519-524

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525-530

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531-536

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537-542

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543-548

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549-554

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555-560

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561-566

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567-572

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573-578

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579-584

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585-590

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591-596

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Holiday Special 1981

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Battle with Stormforce

630-632

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633-635

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636-638

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639-641

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642,644,645

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646-648

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649-651

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652-654

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655-657

Issue 657 is incorrect, that is a duplicate from issue 635.

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658-660

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662-664

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Battle Picture Weekly (8 March 1975 [issue #1] – 16 October 1976 [issue #85])

1-8

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9-17

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18-25

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26-33

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34-40

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41-47

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48-54

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55-60

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61-66

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67-72

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73-78

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79-85

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Battle Picture Weekly and Valiant (23 October 1976 [issue #86] – 1 October 1977 [issue #135])

86-91

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92-97

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98-103

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104-109

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110-115

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116-121

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122-127

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128-135

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Battle Picture Weekly (8 October 1977 [issue #136] – 12 November 1977 [issue #141])

136-141

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Annual 1979,1980

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Holiday Special 1979,1980

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Summer Special 1975-1978

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Battle Action (19 November 1977 [issue #142] – 25 July 1981 [issue #325])

142-147

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148-153

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154-159

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160-165

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166-171

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172-177

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178-183

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184-189

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190-195

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196-201

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202-207

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208-213

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214-219

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220-225

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226-231

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232-237

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238-243

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244-249

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250-255

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256-261

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262-267

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268-273

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274-279

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280-285

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286-291

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292-297

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298-306

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307-325

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Battle (1 August 1981 [issue #326] – 1 October 1983 [issue #439])

326-341

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342-357

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358-373

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374-389

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390-405

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406-421

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422-439

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Holiday Special 1982,1983,1987-1991

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Battle Action Force (8 October 1983 [issue #440] – 29 November 1986 [issue #604])

440-454

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455-469

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470-484

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485-500

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Annual 1985,1987

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Holiday Special 1984-1986

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Yogi and his toy

Publisher: Williams Publishing
Publication Dates: 1972 – 1972
Number of Issues Published: 35 (#1 – #35)
Color: Colour
Publishing Format: Was ongoing

Numbering continues in Hanna-Barbera’s Fun Time (Williams Publishing, 1972 series).

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

2,4


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6,7


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8,11


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12,14


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15,23,27



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World Adventure Library

Batman

Publisher: World Distributors
Publication Dates: 1966 – ?
Number of Issues Published: 11 (#1 – #11)
Color: Colour cover with black and white interior
Dimensions: Digest Size
Paper Stock: Newsprint
Publishing Format: Was Ongoing Series

Man From Uncle

Publisher: World Distributors
Publication Dates: 1966 – ?
Number of Issues Published: 14 (#1 – #14)

Mandrake

Publisher: World Distributors
Publication Dates: 1967 – 1967
Number of Issues Published: 8 (#1 – #8)
Color: Colour Cover; Black and White Interior
Dimensions: Digest-size
Paper Stock: Glossy cover; Newsprint interior
Publishing Format: Was ongoing

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

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UPDATE 19-02-2018

Superman 2

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Man From Uncle 5,6


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Man From Uncle 7,8


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Man From Uncle 10, Mandrake 1


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Batman 3

In the rar is the name Batman 5, but it is actually 3, just rename the book and it’s ok.

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Pow!

Publisher: IPC
Publication Dates: 21 January 1967 – 13 January 1968
Number of Issues Published: 52 (#1 – #52)
Color: Colour Cover, Black & White Interior Dimensions: 9.25″ x 13″
Binding: Saddle-Stitched
Publishing Format: Was ongoing
Publication Type: magazine

Numbering continues with Pow! and Wham! (IPC, 1968 series) #53

Pow and Wham

Publisher: IPC
Publication Dates: 20 January 1968 – 7 September 1968
Number of Issues Published: 34 (#53 – #86)
Color: Colour Cover, Black & White Interior Dimensions: 9.25″ x 13″
Binding: Saddle-Stitched
Publishing Format: Was ongoing
Publication Type: magazine

Numbering continues from Pow! (IPC, 1967 series) #52

Merges with Smash! 14 September 1968 #137

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

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UPDATE 19-02-2018

1,2

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8,45,49,50

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68,69,71

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75,78,81

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Annual 1969,1970


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Annual 1971

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7,21,53,85,86





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Harold Hare

Own Paper

Publisher: IPC
Publication Dates: November 14th 1959 – 13 October 1962
Number of Issues Published: 21 (#14 November 1959 – #13 October 1962)

Incorporates Walt Disney’s Weekly starting with the 29 April 1961 issue.

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

When a hare has his birthday on March 1st you would expect him to be a little mad. Most of the inhabitants of Leafy Wood would probably agree that Harold lives up to the ‘mad March hare’ stereotype as he scampers from one topsy-turvy situation to another. Harold, on the other hand, would disagree. Is it that mad to have a house where all the furniture is upside down and the cupboards stocked with jam? Not to Harold. He simply wants to enjoy life and sometimes his over-enthusiasm leads to trouble. A little ingenuity and a little help from his friends – Happy Hedgehog and Dicky Dormouse – usually sees everything put to right before long.

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UPDATE 19-02-2018

Own Paper 15

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207, Own Paper 22


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Own Paper 23,54


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Own Paper 68,69


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