roy1

roy

Publication Dates: 25 September 1976 – 20 March 1993
Number of Issues Published: 851 (#1 – #851)
Color: Colour
Dimensions: Magazine size
Paper Stock: Newsprint
Binding: Saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Was ongoing

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Roy of the Rovers is a British comic strip about the life and times of a fictional footballer named Roy Race, who played for Melchester Rovers. The strip first appeared in the Tiger in 1954, before giving its name to a weekly (and later monthly) comic magazine, published by IPC and Fleetway from 1976 until 1995, in which it was the main feature.

The weekly strip ran until 1993, following Roy’s playing career until its conclusion after he lost his left foot in a helicopter crash. When the monthly comic was launched later that year the focus switched to Roy’s son Rocky, who also played for Melchester. This publication was short-lived, and folded after only 19 issues. The adventures of the Race family were subsequently featured in the monthly Match of the Day football magazine, in which father and son were reunited as manager and player respectively. These strips began in 1997 and continued until the magazine’s closure in May 2001.

Football-themed stories were a staple of British comics from the 1950s onwards, and Roy of the Rovers was one of the most popular. To keep the strip exciting, Melchester was almost every year either competing for major honours or struggling against relegation to a lower division. The strip followed the structure of the football season, thus there were several months each year when there was no football. By far the most common summer storyline saw Melchester touring a fictional country in an exotic part of the world, often South America, where they would invariably be kidnapped and held to ransom. The average reader probably stayed with the comic for only three or four years, therefore storylines were recycled; during the first ten years of his playing career, Roy was kidnapped at least five times.

The stock media phrase “real ‘Roy of the Rovers’ stuff” is often used by football writers, commentators and fans when describing displays of great skill, or results that go against the odds, in reference to the dramatic storylines that were the strip’s trademark.

Roy of the Rovers first appeared on 11 September 1954, as a weekly feature in the comic magazine Tiger, debuting on the front page of the first issue. After 22 years of continued popularity, the strip was judged successful enough to sustain its own weekly comic, the eponymous Roy of the Rovers, launched on 25 September 1976. The comic ran for 851 issues, until 20 March 1993, and included other football strips and features. At the peak of the comic’s success about 450,000 copies were sold each week. There were also hardback annuals and holiday specials featuring a mix of reprinted and original content, and for a brief period, starting in 1986, Roy of the Rovers was serialised in the now defunct Today newspaper. These were all-new strips, focusing largely on the relationship between Roy and his wife Penny, rather than the action on the pitch. Between 1988 and 1993, a Best of Roy of the Rovers monthly comic was published, reprinting older stories.

Roy was created by the author Frank S. Pepper, who had created the similar strip, Danny of the Dazzlers, but he only wrote four instalments of Roy of the Rovers, because of his commitments to another of his characters, Captain Condor. His role was taken by the strip’s first artist Joe Colquhoun, who used the pen-name “Stewart Colwyn”. He was replaced after four-and-a-half years by Derek Birnage, the editor of Tiger, who had commissioned the strip. In 1960, in an attempt to whip up publicity, it was announced that the footballer Bobby Charlton had taken over as writer, although in reality it was still written by Birnage (who claimed that he did consult with Charlton occasionally for story ideas). The longest-serving writer of the strip was Tom Tully, who began in 1969 on an intermittent basis and then continuously from 1974 until the end of the weekly comic in 1993. Ian Rimmer became the main writer for the strip during the Match of the Day years, until the magazine’s closure in May 2001.

Artists

After Joe Colquhoun departed, he was succeeded first by Paul Trevillion, then by Yvonne Hutton, who illustrated from 1967 to 1974, before David Sque took over in 1975. Despite reportedly not being a football fan, he was responsible for one of the strip’s more definitive looks in its early ’80s period. He was replaced in 1986 by former 2000 AD artist Mike White, who gave Roy a more muscular look and the strip a more modern feel. Barrie Mitchell took over in 1992, with a style quite similar to White’s. A number of artists worked on the monthly comic, such as David Jukes, Sean Longcroft and Garry Marshall, in contrast to the lengthy tenures of the weekly strip’s creative team. Tony Harding often illustrated Roy for the Roy of the Rovers annuals and also drew the Roy’s Action Replay strip that appeared in All Action Monthly in the late eighties (Fleetway). Mitchell returned in 1997 as the sole artist of the Match of the Day strips for all four years.

Filmmakers Luke Dormehl and Tom Atkinson, released a documentary called “Roy” in 2008, featuring interviews with some of the key members of the Roy of the Rovers creative team. The film was shown at The End of the Pier International Film Festival in 2009, where it won the prize for Best Documentary Short.

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UPDATE 30-10-2017

292

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UPDATE 29-10-2017

461-463



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UPDATE 25-09-2017

9,10,12,14

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177,178,216,217

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218,219,220,283

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284-287

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288-291

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293-296

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297-300

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301-304

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305,309,310,311

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312-315

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316,318.319,320

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321-324

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325-328

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329-332

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333-336

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337-340

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341-345

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347-351

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352-356

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357-361

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362-366

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367-371

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376-379

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390-393

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394-397

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398,403.404,405

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406-410

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411-415

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416-420

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421-425

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426-430

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431-435

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438-441

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Annual 1980

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Annual 1982

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Annual 1986

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Holiday Special 1984

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UPDATE 14-06-2017

384-389






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399-402,436,437






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UPDATE 01-10-2016

2,27,28,31,76-78

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79,83-88

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89-95

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96-100,105,106

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188,193,198,210,211,214,215

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223,224,235,237,238,240,241

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242-244,247,248,251,252

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268,269, Annual 1991

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Annual 1984

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380-383

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UPDATE 10-02-2016

1,5-7,11,13,15

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17-22

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23,24,26,30,37,39

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41,42,44-47

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48,50-54

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55-60

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61,65,73,75,101,102

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103,104,107-110

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111-117

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118-124

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126-128,131,132,134,135

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136,138-140,221,222

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UPDATE 29-06-2015

16,81,82,125,129,130,133

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137,141,142,151,155,160,164

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168,180,208,267,270-272

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273-280

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281,282,306-308,317,346

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3,4,8,25,29,32,33

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34,35,36,38,40,43,49

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62,63,64,66,67,68,69

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70,71,72,74,80,179,181

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182,183,184,185,189,190,191

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192,194,195,196,197,199,200

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201,202,203,204,205,206,207

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209,211,213,225,226,227,228

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229,230,231,232,233,234,236

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239,245,246,249,250,253,254

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255,256,257,258,259,260

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261,262,263,264,265,266

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Annual 1966,1968,1987

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Annual 1988,1989,1990,1992,1994, Eastern Promise

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33 responses »

  1. Zackster says:

    Snagged these off eBay, might be some double ups. Feel free to add them to above. Hopefully someone can fill in the 1976 gaps- issues 9,10 & 12 needed to compete the set.

    1976
    http://filefactory.com/folder/06531158e5b101da
    or
    https://mega.nz/#F!URMDAQTB!JbJAct0DM0kfFZYjqVQpkA

    1977 (complete)
    http://filefactory.com/folder/0f8ab20bae53555d
    or
    https://mega.nz/#F!ZV8zQBSI!AmYnB5uJBn9oXFF0EKZj2g

    Like

    • boutje777 says:

      Thanks for the links, i will see they wil get in the right place somewhere next week.
      Onfortunately they are all numbers allready on the blog, thanks for the trouble nevertheless.

      Like

  2. Bryan says:

    Had a look through your blog and noticed you were missing the following issues 14,177,178.216-220,283,293,294.376-379 and Holiday Special 1984

    here they are: http://www.filefactory.com/file/r3xgmho68w3/new%20roy.rar

    Like

  3. Bryan says:

    You’re welcome. I’ve taken so much from this blog, I thought it was time to give something back.

    Like

    • Zackster says:

      Thanks Bryan. I gather the entire run must be out there somewhere, but near impossible to find (ditto for Tiger). I’ve managed to get hold of the print versions of the missing 1976 issues, and have the entire run in print from 1979-1989 but it would take a lifetime to scan them all. I will scan the missing ’76 issues and post here at some stage though.

      Like

      • Bryan says:

        Finding them slowly, but anything post-1986 seems not to exist online. The hunt continues I have a few issues from ’86, but are a nightmare to scan as they are slightly bigger than A4. needing to scan each page in two parts.

        Like

        • Zackster says:

          I picked up an A3 scanner, so can do the older ones 2 pages at a time, when they switched to the newsprint format size, only one page fits but easier than on an A4 scanner. Real pain. I’ll try and get Roy # 9 & 10 scanned over the next few days.

          Like

      • Bryan says:

        Slowly getting early Tigers, hopefully get them uploaded this weekend

        Like

  4. Bryan says:

    Seriously thinking of buying one, depends on the quote I get from a company to scan my comics

    Like

  5. Bryan says:

    lots more to come this evening/tomorrow

    Liked by 1 person

    • boutje777 says:

      I think i’ve got them all. I will start preparing somewhere this month for the next update, just like all others that people have been uploading the last weeks (with a few execptions that i could not download for some strange reason). I hope all new comics are on the right pages at the end of the month.

      Like

  6. Donald says:

    I noticed that issue 292 is also missing. Does anyone know where i can find it?

    Like

  7. Tony Terry says:

    Thanks guys for all these links do you have all the 851 issues?

    Like

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