doctor1

doctor

Weekly

Publisher: Marvel UK
Publication Dates: October 17 1979 – August 7 1980
Number of Issues Published: 43 (#1 – #43)
Color: Colour cover; Black and White interior
Dimensions: Magazine size
Paper Stock: Glossy cover
Binding: Saddle-stitched

Monthly

Publisher: Marvel UK
Publication Dates: 1980 – 1984
Number of Issues Published: 41 (#44 – #84)
Color: Black and White
Dimensions: A4
Paper Stock: Glossy cover
Binding: Saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Ongoing Series
Publication Type: Magazine

Magazine

Publisher: Marvel UK-Panini
Publication Dates: 1984 – Present
Number of Issues Published: Still counting
Color: Black and White
Dimensions: Magazine
Paper Stock: Glossy
Binding: Saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Was ongoing
Publication Type: magazine

Classic Comics

Publisher: Marvel UK
Publication Dates: 9 December 1992 – 7th December 1994
Number of Issues Published: 27 (#1 – #27)

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Doctor Who Magazine (abbreviated as DWM) is a magazine devoted to the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. Its current editor is Marcus Hearn, who took over from the magazine’s longest-serving editor, Tom Spilsbury, in July 2017. It is currently recognised by Guinness World Records as the longest running TV tie-in magazine.

Officially licensed by the BBC, the magazine began life as Doctor Who Weekly in 1979, published by the UK arm of Marvel Comics. The first issue was released on Thursday 11 October with a cover date of 17 October and priced 12p.

The magazine moved from weekly to monthly publication with issue 44 in September 1980, becoming Doctor Who Monthly with a cover price of 30p. Styled on the cover as ‘Doctor Who – A Marvel Monthly’ the tagline was not part of the name, but simply a descriptor which appeared on many of Marvel UK’s monthly titles at that point. The copyright notice continued describing the publication as ‘Doctor Who Weekly’ until issue 48. The cover title changed to Doctor Who Monthly with issue 61. The title changed to The Official Doctor Who Magazine with issue 85 in February 1984. It became The Doctor Who Magazine with issue 99 in April 1985, and simply Doctor Who Magazine with issue 107 in December 1985. The magazine has remained under that title ever since, although an exception was made for issue 397 in June 2008 when the cover only featured the words Bad Wolf following transmission of the Doctor Who episode “Turn Left” on Saturday 21 June. In 1990 the magazine started appearing once every four weeks (13 times a year). Despite the BBC discontinuing production of Doctor Who in 1989, the magazine continued to be published, providing new adventures in the form of comics. The television programme was revived in 2005, providing a new generation of fans which the magazine was seeking to attract.

The format has changed over the years, but the news, letters, reviews, and comic strip have all been present consistently since the early 1980s.

==================================================

UPDATE 05-05-2018

Doctor Who Marvel Premiere 57-60




Download

==================================================

==================================================

UPDATE 05-04-2018

K9 Annual 1982

Download

==================================================

*This title is complete* (Weekly, Monthly, Magazine, Classic Comics)

Weekly

1-6

Download

7-12

Download

13-20

Download

21-26

Download

27-32

Download

33-43

Download

Monthly

44-47

Download

48-51

Download

52-55

Download

56-58

Download

59-61

Download

62-64

Download

65-74

Download

75-84

Download

Magazine

85-96

Download

97-104

Download

105-112

Download

113-120

Download

121-128

Download

129-138

Download

139-148

Download

149-156

Download

157-166

Download

167-172

Download

173-176

Download

177-180

Download

181,182

Download

183-186

Download

187-194

Download

195-202

Download

203-206

Download

207-212

Download

213-218

Download

219-224

Download

225-230

Download

231-236

Download

237-242

Download

243-246

Download

247-254

Download

255-262

Download

263-268

Download

269-272

Download

273-275

Download

Classic Comics

1-10

Download

11-14

Download

15-19

Download

20-27

Download

Autumn Special 1993

Download

Annuals

Annual 1966
Annual 1967
Annual 1968
Annual 1969
Annual 1970
Annual 1971

Download

Annual 1973
Annual 1974
Annual 1975
Annual 1976
Annual 1977
Annual 1978
Annual 1979

Download

Annual 1980
Annual 1981
Annual 1982
Annual 1983
Annual 1984
Annual 1985
Annual 1986

Download

Specials and Various

10th Anniversary Special
25th Anniversary Special 1988
Abslom Daak Dalek Killer
Autumn Special 1987
Collected Comics 1987
Colouring Book 1973
Dinosaur Book 1976
Fun Book 1987

Download

Holiday Special 1973
Holiday Special 1974
Holiday Special 1992
Illustrated A-Z 1985
Invasion from space
Movie Special 1995
Space Adventure Book
Spring Special 1995

Download

Summer Special 1980
Summer Special 1981
Summer Special 1982
Summer Special 1983
Summer Special 1984
Summer Special 1985
Summer Special 1986
Summer Special 1991
Summer Special 1993
Summer Special 1994
Summer Special 1995

Download

Winter Special 1977
Winter Special 1981
Winter Special 1982
Winter Special 1983
Winter Special 1984
Winter Special 1985
Winter Special 1986
Winter Special 1991
Winter Special 1992
Winter Special 1993
Winter Special 1994

Download

Yearbook 1992
Yearbook 1993
Yearbook 1994
Yearbook 1995
Yearbook 1996

Download

The age of chaos
Voyager


Download

Daleks

Dalek Annual 1976
Dalek Annual 1977
Dalek Annual 1978
Dalek Annual 1979
Dalek Book 1964

Download

Dalek Chronicles 1994

Download

Dalek Outer Space Book 1966
Dalek World 1965

Download

Advertisements

5 responses »

  1. CYRILLE says:

    Great ! Many thanks !

    Like

  2. leemcdaid says:

    Just a note for anyone who doesn’t already know, they didn’t publish a Doctor Who Annual in 1972… they skipped that year for some reason.

    So, there’s no point trying to hunt it down as it doesn’t exist!

    Lee

    Like

  3. Andy says:

    For the devoted Doctor Who merchandise collector, the annuals are usually a high priority on the list of ‘must-have’s. Although the visual and literary qualities of these books are at best reasonable and at worst dire and bizarre, they are desirable items and can sometimes fetch quite high prices. The fact that most are now very difficult to obtain – necessitating ferreting through dusty second-hand bookstores, flea markets and school fairs – perhaps makes the pursuit of a complete set of Doctor Who Annuals all the more appealing.

    There were twenty ‘regular’ Doctor Who annuals published by World Distributors (later World International); two Hartnell, three Troughton, four Pertwee, seven Tom Baker, two Davison and two Colin Baker annuals. Each annual was published in September, allowing a sufficient sales period prior to Christmas, though it is important to note that the date (most but not all annuals were dated), printed on the cover is always that of the following year. The first annual was published in 1965 for 1966, and thereafter the books appeared on a regular basis, missing only one year: there was no 1972 annual published in 1971. The last annual was published in 1985, cover dated 1986.

    In addition to these twenty regular annuals, there were an additional eight books following the same annual format published by World. Four of these were yearly editions of Terry Nation’s Dalek Annual, dated 1976 to 1979, as well as a K9 Annual 1983, a special promotional publication entitled The Amazing World of Doctor Who in 1976, and compilation volumes reprinting material from earlier annuals: Adventures in Space and Time in 1981, and Journeys Through Time in 1985.

    The twenty regular annuals contained between six and twelve stories, most of which were text, with the occasional comic strip, featuring the Doctor usually accompanied by one or more of his television companions. These stories were interspersed with features, puzzles and games, which almost never had anything to do with Doctor Who, and seem to have simply acted as space-fillers to reach the required page-count.

    The writers and artists were rarely credited for their work; the writing chores were sometimes shipped out to freelancers, though mostly they were undertaken in-house by editorial department staff. Once written the stories were submitted to the BBC for approval.

    Although most of the annuals were printed in Great Britain, the fact that many were printed in countries including Italy, Spain and Belgium led to the long-held mistaken belief in fandom that many of the internal illustrations were done by foreign artists, since the likenesses of the Doctor and his companions – especially during the Tom Baker era – were often very poor. In fact the artwork was almost invariably done in-house at World’s art studios, based in Manchester.

    In addition to the ‘annual’ type hardback books, World Distributors also published a hardback book in 1966 called Doctor Who and the Invasion from Space which at first glance has the appearance of a Hartnell annual, but is in fact just one story, written by J.L. Morrissey.

    World Distributors also published a number of Doctor Who activity books, including all of the following in 1966: Dr Who on the planet Zactus Painting Book, Dr Who – Travels in Space Painting Book No.1, Dr Who Painting Book No.2, Dr Who Sticker Fun Book – Travels in Space, Dr Who Sticker Fun Book – Travels in Time, Doctor Who Puzzle Fun No.1 and Doctor Who Puzzle Fun No.2. In the 1970s, three more activity books were produced by World Distributors: The Dr Who Colouring Book (1973), Doctor Who Press-Out Book (1978) and Doctor Who Colouring Book (1979).

    In the Sixties there were three Dalek books released in a similar format to the annuals. These were published by Souvenir Press & Panther Books, the earliest of which pre-dated the first Hartnell annual: The Dalek Book (1964), The Dalek World (1965) and The Dalek Outer Space Book (1966). All three of these books are even harder to find than the earliest annuals.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Andy says:

    Doctor Who Annuals started in 1966, skipped 1972, Continued 1973 through to 1986,
    then resumed by Marvel 1992 to 1996, revived for 2006 until 2018 at present.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ian says:

    Marvel Premiere is an American comic book anthology series published by Marvel Comics. In concept it was a tryout book, intended to determine if a character or concept could attract enough readers to justify launching their own series, though in its later years it was also often used as a dumping ground for stories which could not be published elsewhere. It ran for 61 issues from April 1972 to August 1981. Contrary to the title, the majority of the characters and concepts featured in Marvel Premiere had previously appeared in other comics.
    Contents

    Publication history

    Marvel Premiere was one of three tryout books proposed by Stan Lee after he transitioned from being Marvel Comics’ writer and editor to its president and publisher, the others being Marvel Spotlight and Marvel Feature. The advantage of such tryout books was that they allowed the publisher to assess a feature’s popularity without the marketing investment required to launch a new series, and without the blow to the publisher’s image with readers if the new series immediately failed.

    In addition to giving established characters a first shot at a starring role, Marvel Premiere introduced new characters and reintroduced characters who no longer had their own titles. Writer Roy Thomas and penciler Gil Kane revamped Him as the allegorical Messiah Adam Warlock in Marvel Premiere #1 (April 1972). Doctor Strange took over the series with issue #3 and writer Steve Englehart and artist Frank Brunner began a run on the character with issue #9. The two killed Dr. Strange’s mentor, the Ancient One, and Strange became the new Sorcerer Supreme. Englehart and Brunner created a multi-issue storyline in which a sorcerer named Sise-Neg (“Genesis” spelled backward) goes back through history, collecting all magical energies, until he reaches the beginning of the universe, becomes all-powerful and creates it anew, leaving Strange to wonder whether this was, paradoxically, the original creation. Stan Lee, seeing the issue after publication, ordered Englehart and Brunner to print a retraction saying this was not God but “a” god, so as to avoid offending religious readers. The writer and artist concocted a fake letter from a fictitious minister praising the story, and mailed it to Marvel from Texas; Marvel unwittingly printed the letter, and dropped the retraction order. In 2010, Comics Bulletin ranked Englehart and Brunner’s run on the “Doctor Strange” feature ninth on its list of the “Top 10 1970s Marvels”.

    Iron Fist first appeared in issue #15, written by Roy Thomas and drawn by Gil Kane. Other introductions include the Legion of Monsters, the Liberty Legion, Woodgod, the 3-D Man, and the second Ant-Man (Scott Lang). The series also featured the first comic book appearance of rock musician Alice Cooper.

    Though Adam Warlock, Doctor Strange, and Iron Fist were all given their own series following their tryout in Marvel Premiere, many of the later features were never meant even as potential candidates for a series. In some cases, such as the Wonder Man story in issue #55 and the Star-Lord story in #61, the writer simply wanted to do a story featuring that character and there wasn’t a more appropriate place for it to be published. Some features, such as Seeker 3000 (issue #41), were conceived specifically for Marvel Premiere but with no real plan for a series. Later in the title’s run, Marvel Premiere was used to finish stories of characters who had lost their own series including the Man-Wolf in issues #45–46 and the Black Panther in issues #51–53.

    Issues

    #1–2 – Adam Warlock (moved to his own series)
    #3–14 – Doctor Strange (moved to his own second series)
    #15–25 – Iron Fist (moved to his own series)
    #26 – Hercules
    #27 – Satana
    #28 – Legion of Monsters
    #29–30 – Liberty Legion
    #31 – Woodgod
    #32 – Monark Starstalker
    #33–34 – Solomon Kane
    #35–37 – 3-D Man
    #38 – Weirdworld
    #39–40 – Torpedo
    #41 – Seeker 3000
    #42 – Tigra
    #43 – Paladin
    #44 – Jack of Hearts
    #45–46 – Man-Wolf
    #47–48 – Ant-Man (Scott Lang)
    #49 – The Falcon
    #50 – Alice Cooper
    #51–53 – Black Panther
    #54 – Caleb Hammer
    #55 – Wonder Man
    #56 – Dominic Fortune
    #57–60 – Doctor Who (reprints from Marvel UK’s Doctor Who Weekly)
    #61 – Star-Lord

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s